Friday, February 14, 2020

Coronavirus, 2019-nCoV, COVID-19: Separating fact from fiction

(NOTE: Some of the information below may have become outdated since this post's publication on February 14, 2020. For the most current information, visit the COVID-19 webpages from the Louisiana Department of Health and the CDC.)

By DR. ALEX BILLIOUX | Assistant Secretary, LDH Office of Public Health

In its short lifetime, the disease most recently spreading fear across the globe has gone through several names: novel coronavirus, 2019-nCoV and now, finally and officially, COVID-19. By now, you’ve heard all about it online, in the newspapers and on television. With so many sources of information, it can be easy for falsehoods to spread like wildfire and be taken for the gospel truth. Before looking at why some of these falsehoods are wrong, let’s get educated about this disease.

About COVID-19

Source: CDC's Public Health Image Library
COVID-19, or coronavirus, is a virus that causes respiratory illness in people and can spread from person to person. It was first identified in Wuhan, China, where an outbreak of pneumonia-like illness of an unknown cause began in December 2019. The coronavirus name refers to the crown-like spikes on its surface, and “corona” means “halo” or “crown” in Latin.


The virus has been spreading from person to person in China and, through travelers, limited spread in some countries outside China, including the United States. As of February 13, the U.S. has just 15 cases of COVID-19 and the threat to the general public remains very low.

COVID-10 is similar to flu in that it is most often spread from person to person within 6 feet, mainly through the respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of nearby people who then inhale the virus into their lungs.

Reported illnesses among people who are confirmed to be infected have ranged from little to no symptoms, to severe illness and death. Symptoms include fever, cough and shortness of breath/difficulty breathing. These symptoms may appear within as few as two days or as long as 14 days after exposure.

Now that the basics are covered, let’s stamp out some misinformation.

Myth busters

MYTH: Coronaviruses are new.
REALITY: COVID-19, which is currently circulating, is a new strain derived from an ancient family of coronaviruses that were first identified back in the 1960s. Think of it as a new branch suddenly growing on a very old tree. The tree has been there for years and years, but that new branch only sprouted recently.

MYTH: COVID-19 is currently the top public health threat in Louisiana.
REALITY: There are no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Louisiana. You are far more likely to get the flu than COVID-19. Louisiana’s flu season began way back in August, hitting particularly hard, and shows no signs of stopping anytime soon. We are still seeing widespread flu activity across the state and are 6.7% above the national baseline.


Help prevent respiratory viruses like flu and COVID-19 with these simple everyday actions:
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol in addition to washing with soap and water.

One more preventive measure: Get your flu shot. It doesn’t protect against COVID-19 but it’s still really important to get one, and here’s why: If you didn’t get a flu shot and then you got the flu, which is a respiratory illness, your body would be more vulnerable to other respiratory illnesses such as COVID-19. So, get that flu shot. They’re available at no cost at any parish health unit. Local pharmacies, clinics, doctors’ offices and federally qualified (community) health centers also have flu shots available. To find a flu shot provider near you or for more flu information, click here.

MYTH: Ordering or buying products shipped from China will make a person sick.
REALITY: It’s totally safe to receive packages from China because coronaviruses such as COVID-19 do not survive long on objects, including letters and packages. This also means food and clothing cannot spread COVID-19.

MYTH: Pets can spread COVID-19.
REALITY: There’s no evidence that pets can be infected with COVID-19. However, keep in mind that you should always wash your hands with soap and water after having contact with pets. Hand washing will protect you against E. coli and salmonella, which can be passed from pets to humans.

MYTH: Drinking Corona beer will cure COVID-19.
REALITY: Nope. Just, nope. Having one or two might help you relax, but always drink safely and in moderation.

The bottom line

As a public health official, a doctor, a husband and a father, I understand the worries out there around COVID-19. Just remember these three things:
  • The threat to Louisiana is very low.
  • Practice everyday actions like hand washing.
  • Get your flu shot.

And, should COVID-19 show up in Louisiana, the Office of Public Health in coordination with the Governor’s Office has planned extensively in advance. We’re ready to spring into immediate action, dedicated to keeping you safe and healthy.

6 comments:

  1. Are test kits available in Louisiana at this moment?

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  2. How many test kits did Louisiana receive?

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  3. We have five presumed cases in downtown new orleans, are they going to reach out to places those people visited in the days prior(ie. gyms, restaurants, churches) to let them know about possible exposure? We should be aware if we may have been exposed so we can get tested and self quarantine if we are experiencing shortness of breath or fever.

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  4. I think that would be a great idea. I think we should all be awar.e

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  5. Our elderly mother resides in an assisted living facility (not a nursing home) in Lake Charles and we are concerned that the facility is not taking up sufficient preventative measures to control and maintain a safe environment as to control and/or mitigate the risk of someone with (positive unknown) entering the facility in absence of appropriate pre-screening. We expect the facility to issue an advisory to all its residents and their family members advising of what actions are being taken....but so far, nothing. What is the LADPH doing in terms of advising, recommending or in some cases possibly requiring such facilities to do at this time.

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